Foot and Ankle Specialists

 

 

Provided to our established patients by the Treasure Coast Podiatry Professionals at the following Medical Centers:

Martin Memorial Hospital North

Martin Memorial Hospital South

Martin Memorial Hospital Tradition

Lawnwood Regional Medical Center

Raulerson Hospital

 

By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
February 15, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Cryosurgery  

CryotherapyWhen your feet hurt, your entire body hurts, especially when you're suffering from painful neuromas or heel pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Generally, rest, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy or orthotics can effectively treat the pain. But when these conservative treatments aren't enough, chronic heel pain may require surgical treatment.

At Treasure Coast Podiatry Center we can treat irritating heel pain and get you back to your active lifestyle quickly with a new, fast-acting procedure known as Cryosurgery. For decades, this technique has been used for various areas of the body and is now proving to be very successful at helping treat and manage foot and ankle conditions.

The Procedure

Also known as Cryotherapy, Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive procedure performed comfortably in our Stuart office in just one appointment to alleviate pain and nerve problems of the foot.

Using localized freezing temperatures to deaden the irritated nerve, the treatment involves inserting a probe into the tissue of the foot. The extreme freezing temperatures produce an anesthetic effect, reducing inflammation to the site and causing a mild "numbing" effect for as long as it is applied. The freezing inactivates the nerve and, as a result, painful nerve irritation is relieved.

Benefits of Cryosurgery from Treasure Coast Podiatry Center include:

  • Painless procedure
  • Use of local anesthetic
  • In-office performed procedure
  • Minimal to no down time from walking, work and other activities
  • Decreased use of pain medications that can cause complications
  • No stitches, hospitalization or sedation are required

Cryosurgery has proven to be an effective and popular alternative for treating many chronic and painful foot ailments that involve irritation of an isolated nerve of the foot. If you're looking to get rid of your heel pain, but haven't had much success with conservative treatments, visit our Stuart office and find out if you are a good candidate for Cryosurgery.

By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
February 01, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Painful Arthritis  

Foot ArthritisWith age, it’s not uncommon to experience pain and stiffness in your feet and ankles.  Carefully monitoring your pain is important, however, as this noticeable discomfort could be an early indication of a more serious condition known as arthritis. Arthritis is a group of conditions that typically involves pain and inflammation in the joints.  There are many types of arthritis, with osteoarthritis being the most common form.  Left untreated, pain caused by arthritis will get worse, eventually leading to joint weakness that can interfere with the most basic daily activities.  

Arthritis can have a serious impact on the structure and function of your feet and ankles. See a podiatrist if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Swelling
  • Chronic pain or tenderness
  • Limited mobility or motion
  • Stiffness early in the day
  • Changes in skin, including growths and rashes                                              

Whenever you notice a change in your lower extremities, contact our podiatrists at Treasure Coast Podiatry Center for a thorough evaluation. When detected early, proper treatment can slow the development of arthritis and get you back to your active lifestyle.

Treating Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle

Treasure Coast Podiatry Center can help you determine the best treatment option depending on the type and severity of your arthritis.  

Treatment options include:

  • Anti-inflammatory medications or steroid injections for the joint
  • Shoe insets, pads, braces or arch supports
  • Physical therapy and exercise
  • Custom-designed shoes
  • Weight management

When arthritis doesn’t respond to conservative treatment, surgical intervention may be considered as the last resort.

A thorough evaluation of your health and type of arthritis will allow our podiatrists to recommend the best treatment plan for you. Arthritis is a disabling disease, but with early detection, you can help manage the pain associated with arthritis of the foot and ankle and maintain a healthy, fulfilling life.  Allow our Stuart podiatrists to assess your foot and ankle pain and get you back on your feet.

By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
January 16, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Sprains  

Ankle SprainAn ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries to the ankle, resulting from a fall or a sudden twist that forces the ligaments out of their normal position. It’s no wonder so many athletes suffer from ankle sprains every year.

The severity of an ankle sprain depends on whether the ligament is stretched, partially torn or completely torn. Look for the following symptoms if you think you have sprained your ankle:

  • Immediate pain at the site of the tear
  • Immediate swelling
  • Hearing or feeling something tear, pop or snap during the twist
  • Bruising
  • Pain and difficulty moving the ankle
  • Inability to walk or bear weight on the ankle

Treating your ankle sprain

Early treatment of a sprained ankle can improve the recovery time and minimize symptoms. The following steps will reduce swelling and help alleviate pain until you can get into our Stuart office.

  • Rest: Stay off your ankle as much as possible. This will ease pain as well as reduce the swelling.
  • Ice: It’s critical to ice your injured ankle throughout the day for the first 24 hours or until the swelling goes down.
  • Compression: Elastic wraps, such as an ACE bandage, will help reduce swelling.
  • Elevation: Rest with your ankle above the level of your heart to keep swelling to a minimum.  

Preventing injuries to the ankle

With extra care, you can help avoid ankle injuries.

  • Wear appropriate shoes for each activity
  • Throw out old, worn out shoes
  • Be cautious of wet, slippery floors at work or at home
  • Wear ankle braces or have your ankle taped during sport activities for increased stability

If you’ve injured your ankle and are experiencing pain or difficulty walking, come into our Stuart office for an examination and proper diagnosis. If an ankle sprain is not treated promptly with the necessary attention and care, chronic problems of pain and instability may result. Treasure Coast Podiatry Center can recommend a treatment plan based on the severity of the sprain to ensure proper healing and a fast recovery.

By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
January 03, 2012
Category: Foot Care

Achilles TendonThe Achilles tendon is the largest and strongest tendon in the body, located in the back of the lower leg and connecting the heel bone to the calf muscle. This tendon is crucial as it facilitates walking and running by helping to raise the heel off of the ground.  While the tendon can withstand immense force, it’s also surprisingly vulnerable. Injuries to the Achilles tendon require prompt treatment.  

When the Achilles tendon becomes inflamed from excessive use, tendonitis can weaken it over time and cause small tears. Athletes are at a high risk for Achilles tendon injuries, which often occurs at the start of a new exercise or training program, or due to not having enough rest or recovery time.

You don’t have to be an accomplished athlete to suffer an Achilles tendon injury. People with flat feet, arthritis and other foot problems are also more susceptible to develop Achilles tendonitis due to increased demands placed on the tendon when walking.

Common symptoms of Achilles tendonitis include:

  • Mild pain after running or exercising that intensifies gradually
  • Localized pain along the tendon, especially after running
  • Tenderness near the heel bone, with pain being worse first thing in the morning
  • Stiffness and limited range of motion in the lower leg and ankle
  • Swelling around the tendon
  • When the disorder progresses to degeneration, the tendon may become enlarged and develop nodules in the area where the tissue is damaged

To prevent injuries to the Achilles tendon, strengthening and stretching the calf muscles through daily exercise is recommended.  Alternating intense exercise with low-impact workouts and wearing proper shoes for your foot type and activity can also help reduce your risk for injury.

Any time you experience pain, tenderness or swelling along the Achilles tendon, visit Treasure Coast Podiatry Center for professional diagnosis and treatment. Treatment for an injured Achilles tendon should begin right away with rest, ice, compression and elevation.   Without prompt care, Achilles tendonitis will get progressively worse, thus increasing the risk for further deterioration and rupture.   As a last resort and when other treatments fail, surgery may be recommended to repair the tendon.  

The professional podiatrists at our Stuart office can provide the best diagnosis and treatment for optimal recovery.





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