Foot and Ankle Specialists

Posts for: January, 2011

January 17, 2011
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Feet  

DiabeticPeople with diabetes are prone to foot problems, often developing from a combination of poor circulation and nerve damage. Damage to the nerves in the legs and feet diminishes skin sensation, making it difficult to detect or notice pain or temperature changes. A minor sore or scrape on your foot may get infected simply because you don't know it is there. A decrease in blood flow makes it difficult for these injuries to heal. And when a wound isn't healing, it's at risk for infection. Left untreated, minor foot injuries can result in ulceration and even amputation.

Foot Care for Diabetics

Simple daily foot care can help prevent serious health problems associated with diabetes.

At Treasure Coast Podiatry Center, we recommend the following tips for keeping your feet healthy and preventing foot complications:

  • Wash feet daily. Keep feet clean with mild soap and lukewarm water, and dry thoroughly.
  • Moisturize. Moisturize daily to keep dry skin from cracking, and avoid putting lotion between your toes as this may cause infection.
  • Trim your toenails carefully. Cut straight across, avoiding the corners; visit our office for assistance
  • Never treat corns or calluses on your own. Visit your podiatrist for treatment.
  • Protect your feet from hot and cold.
  • Keep the blood flowing in your feet and legs. Elevate your feet when sitting; don't sit cross-legged; and stay active.
  • Inspect your feet every day. Check your feet for cuts, redness, swelling and nail problems. Contact Treasure Coast Podiatry Center if you notice anything unusual- even the slightest change.
  • Avoid Smoking. Smoking restricts blood flow in the feet
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes and never walk barefoot
  • Visit Treasure Coast Podiatry Center for regular exams. Seeing a podiatrist at our Stuart, FL office regularly can help prevent diabetic foot problems.

At Treasure Coast Podiatry Center, we understand that living with diabetes can be challenging. Let's discuss simple ways you can reduce your risk of foot injuries. We'll work with you to create a treatment plan that fits your lifestyle and gets you back on your feet so you can enjoy the things you love. Remember to inspect your feet every day. If you detect an injury- no matter how small- come in for an exam right away.


January 03, 2011
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Corns and Calluses  

CallusesCorns and calluses are thick, hardened areas of skin that develop in response to your body's natural defense to repeated pressure or friction. While neither condition presents a long-term or serious health risk, they can be painful, irritating and unattractive.

Identifying a Corn or Callus

Corns and calluses are similar in nature, but differ in size and location. Corns are smaller than calluses and usually have a hard, thickened center surrounded by red, inflamed skin. They typically develop on the tops and sides of your toes and can be painful when touched. Calluses generally develop on your heels and balls of your feet. They vary in size and shape, although almost always larger than corns.

For most people who develop calluses or corns, eliminating the source of pressure is usually enough to make the thickened skin disappear. recomTreasure Coast Podiatry Center mends the following for treating corns and calluses:

  • Wear comfortable shoes and socks. When footwear fits properly, there is less opportunity for friction and rubbing to occur.
  • Soak your feet in warm, soapy water to help remove corns and calluses. Rub the thickened skin with a pumice stone to remove toughened layers more easily.
  • Keeping your feet moisturized with foot cream or lotion will help improve the quality of your skin and rid your feet from calluses or corns.

When to Seek Care from Treasure Coast Podiatry Center

When corns and calluses don't respond to conservative care, contact our Stuart FL office for a careful evaluation. We can investigate the possible causes of your corn or callus, safely remove the thick, hardened area of skin, and recommend appropriate footwear and treatment, including padding and inserts. Never attempt to cut away a corn or callus on your own, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation. Instead, seek advice from Treasure Coast Podiatry Center, for careful removal and proper care.