Foot and Ankle Specialists

Posts for: February, 2011

By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
February 15, 2011
Category: Foot Care

Foot Care for RunnersIf you're a runner, it goes without saying that your feet take the brunt of the punishment. In fact, for runners the feet are more vulnerable to injury than any other part of the body. Luckily, both long-distance runners and casual joggers can improve their performance by paying extra attention to their feet and taking steps to prevent common foot problems. Poor fitting footwear is often the source of many foot problems caused by running. A visit to Treasure Coast Podiatry Center can help you determine the best shoes for your foot structure.

A Runner's Road Block

While many running-related foot injures can result from a fall or twisted ankle, most running injuries are caused by overuse, meaning the majority of runners experience foot and ankle pain because they do too much for too long. Runners should be aware of the signs of foot problems that can slow them down if not treated promptly. Common foot and ankle injuries experienced by runners include:

Achilles Tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis and other calf-related injuries are prevalent in runners. Poor training, overuse and improper footwear are the three most common reasons for this condition. A sudden increase in distance or pace can strain the muscles and tendons in the foot and ankle, causing small tears within these structures that result in pain and inflammation. Appropriate shoes and training are the most important steps to preventing Achilles tendonitis. Conservative treatment includes, rest, ice, stretching, and sometimes orthotics or physical therapy.

Heel Pain: Runners develop heel pain more than any other foot-related injury. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, which is the result of excess stress placed on a ligament in the bottom of the foot. Rest, stretching and support are the best ways to ease the pain and inflammation. Reduce your mileage and avoid hill and speed workouts. Stretch before and after you run, and ice your heel after each workout. Special splints and shoe inserts from Treasure Coast Podiatry Center may also provide support and relief for your heel pain.

Stress Fractures: Stress fractures are small cracks in the surface of a bone. Runners generally notice gradual muscle soreness, stiffness, and pain on the affected bone, most often in the lower leg or the foot. Early diagnosis is critical as the small fracture can spread and eventually become a complete fracture of the bone. Stress fractures are typically caused by an increase in training that occurs more quickly than the body's ability to build up and strengthen the bone. If you have symptoms of a stress fracture, you should stop running immediately and see a podiatrist at Treasure Coast Podiatry Center. This injury can keep a runner off the roads for several weeks and is not an injury that you can run through. Depending on the severity of the stress fracture, a cast may be necessary.

If you experience chronic foot pain from running, make an appointment with a podiatrist at our Stuart office. Leaving foot injuries untreated could result in more serious conditions, ultimately keeping you from your best performance. Keep in mind that these are not the only foot ailments caused by running, and when at-home foot care isn't effective, you'll need to be evaluated by a podiatrist. As in most cases, prevention is your best treatment. Good footwear, proper training and recognizing a problem before it becomes serious are your keys to staying on the road and avoiding foot injuries.


By Treasure Coast Podiatry Center
February 01, 2011
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Flat Feet  

Flat FeetThe arch structure of our feet determines how we walk, which means our arches need to be both sturdy and flexible in order to adjust to different walking surfaces. For most people, their feet have a curve or an arch at the bottom that provides flexibility and shock absorption. But for the five percent of Adults in the U.S. with flat feet, also known as fallen arches, the arches of their feet are either partially or completely collapsed.

One common type of flatfoot is adult-acquired flatfoot. It is caused by overstretching the tendon that supports the arch. Flexible flatfoot is also common and occurs when the foot is flat when standing, but returns to a normal arch in non-weight-bearing positions.

Factors than increase your risk of flat feet include:

  • Excess weight
  • Age
  • Injury to your foot or ankle
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Pregnancy

When to See Your Stuart Podiatrist

Most adults with a fallen arch experience little to no pain. For these patients, treatment is rarely necessary. A painful flatfoot, however, may be the sign of a congenital abnormality or an injury to the muscles and tendons of the foot. Pain can be severe, making it difficult to walk, wear shoes and perform simple every day tasks. More than achy feet, flatfoot can also lead to other, more serious problems and pain for your ankles, knees, back and hips.

Common symptoms associated with flat feet include:

  • Swelling along the inside of the ankle
  • Feet that tire easily or ache after standing for an extended period of time
  • A lack of mobility in your foot and difficulty standing on your toes
  • Sore, swollen feet; especially in the heel or arch of your foot

Steps Away from Flatfoot Pain Relief

If you are experiencing pain caused by flatfoot, visit Treasure Coast Podiatry Center for an evaluation. We can identify the cause of your pain and recommend the best treatments for your type of arch.

Talk with your podiatrist about the following treatment options:

  • Shoe inserts/ Orthotics
  • Shoe modifications
  • Rest and ice
  • Stretching exercises
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
  • Surgery

Whether you were born with flat feet or you acquired fallen arches over time, if your flat feet are causing you pain or interfering with your day to day activities, visit Treasure Coast Podiatry Center. We can work with you to determine the best treatment options to eliminate the pain, improve your mobility and get you back to the activities you love.